Natural Law: Strengths & Weaknesses

In the table below are the strengths and weaknesses of Natural Law. Please find underneath it a show video on the same topic. 

Strengths

Weaknesses

1. There is emphasis on innate human reason which is a positive because unlike emotions reason does not change. It also means the theory is universal and can attract a large number of supporters.

1. Natural Law finds it difficult to relate to complex decision to basic principles in practice e.g. should more money be spent on hospitals or schools?

2. Clear-cut approach to morality and establishes common rules.

2. It commits a Naturalistic Fallacy according to G.E.Moore. One cannot derive an ought from an is i.e. is we assume God created a moral law is a fact or that we have a natural inclination to care for others as a fact- this does not we ought to follow the moral law or care for others.

3. The basic principles of preserving human life, reproduction, learning and living in a society are common in all cultures hence Natural Law is a reasonable theory.

3. Natural Law is based on five assumptions, the primary one being that humans and the world in general has a purpose, however, modern science can be used to show why this isn’t the case.

4. Natural Law does not just dictate what should be done it goes beyond that, like Virtue Ethics, it concentrates on human character and virtues.

4. Neilsen uses cultural relativism to question Natural Law and the belief in one common law.

5. Natural Law relies on practical wisdom as well as reason including the body, some emotions and passions sometimes.

5. Baron says that relying too much on reason is bad because this leads to corruption as human nature is corrupt. He believers it is better to follow scripture and revelation. 

6. All things required for happiness e.g. health, friendship etc are morally good and can be achieved through Natural Law.

6. It is difficult to work out the primary purpose of everything e.g. is the primary purpose of sex to procreate or enhance a relationship – the clitoris provides evidence that the sole purpose of sex is not just to have children.

7. It is useful for the issues where the Bible is silent e.g. IVF

7. Some Catholic Scholars believe Natural Law is not enough on its own to be a true Catholic- Church teaching and revelation are of utmost interest too!

8. One cannot rely on predicting consequences because often we are wrong so Natural Law provides a good alternative to consequentialist theories

8. Vardy and Grosh criticize the way Aquinas works from general principles to lesser purposes and sees his view of human nature as unholistic and simplistic. 

9. It puts a high premium on life and protects the vulnerable.

9. It is self-contradictory you cannot say that clear-cut rules are provided and then uses casuistry to allow room fro flexibility.

10. It upholds human rights and has been included in the UN declaration of human rights.

10. What is more important actions or consequences? e.g. if a man with an axe asked you where your friend was surely it is more moral to lie and save the life of your friend?

11. Casuistry allow it benefit from flexibility as well as adhering to benefits from being absolutist.

Kantian Ethics: Strength & Weaknesses

I have recently updated this table so not all strengths and weaknesses are discussed in the above video.

Strengths

Weaknesses

1. Creates a distinction between duty and inclination. Inclination is may be because something benefits us but morality is something above that it is about duty.

1. No rules if two duties conflict e.g. our duty to make other happy and our duty not use an embryo for genetic research even though genetic research makes people happy. Strangely Kant would argue in this situation one duty must not be a true duty. Furthermore, it can impractical in terms of trying to fufil all duties e.g. the duty to care for all patients equally in a hospital faced with a fixed budget.

2. Makes justice impartial because you cannot promote happiness if that happiness undermines another happiness. This is also a criticism of utilitarianism.

2. Personalised rules can not exist as they cannot be universalised. (Could also be a strength)

3. Humans are given intrinsic worth, dignity and respect. Demonstrates that humans have rights.

3. No allowance for compassion or sympathy.

4. We are equal individuals unlike some forms of Christian ethics which suggests that if you do not follow the Lord Jesus Christ you are not equal to other people.

4. What is more important consequences and people or actions? e.g.. man with axe example.

5. Easy to follow with a clear criteria because it is based on innate human reason. More importantly gives us answers which arguably other theories like Situation Ethics do not.

5. Kant’s second formulation of the categorical imperative can be difficult to use in terms of world politics. For example, we cannot scarifice the few at war for the sake of many.

6. People generally do have the same idea about morality.

6. Kant’s deontological theory of ethics is in fact vague. The reason being no two moral situations are the same hence can one maxim fill both situations. No. Is murder the same as self-defence, suicide, abortion?

7. People recognise the idea of duty as a part of being human.

7. The theory only works if everyone agrees with it which is clearly not true. For Natural Law or Virtue Theory to work one doesn’t need everyone to work.

8. It is wholly secular which means it does not rely on the assumption that there is a God unlike Natural Law which if the existence of God is rejected then so is Natural Law.

8. It commits a Naturalistic Fallacy according to G.E.Moore. One cannot derive an ought from an is i.e. can ought really imply can?

9. Is it really universal can everyone really be classified a rational moral agent?

10. Kant argues that happiness is the by-product of morality not the intention behind it – is this suggestion really logical – why would you follow it then?

11. Not everyone is capable of ration decision-making hence theory is not universal.

Data Analysis – Converting Rates-Indices & Real-Nominal

This video is to aid you with economic coursework. When presented with data, you need to know if it needs to be altered in anyway before analysing and so I created this table to help you remember which formulas to use and when.This video is to aid you with economic coursework. When presented with data, you need to know if it needs to be altered in anyway before analysing and so I created this table to help you remember which formulas to use and when. A JPEG image of the table is also attached below.

 

 

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HDI: Human Development Index

HDI – Putting people before markets

What is HDI?
It is a measure of economic development. It compromises of three equally weighted components. It gives a single numerical value between 0-1 and the higher the value the more developed the nation.

What are the components of HDI?

  1. Education – years if schooling and literacy 
  2. Health – Mortality rates
  3. Real GDP per capita at PPP – i.e. real GDP person at PPP (taking into account different costs of living)

What are the advantages and disadvantages of HDI?

Advantages
Disadvantages 
Political competitiveness
Does not take into account poverty or other measures of deprivation 
More factors and reliable ones 
PPP values change very quickly and are likely to be inaccurate or misleading.
easy and cheap to collect data
Still very little sense of income distribution with this measure.
Sign of welfare in the future because improving health and education are both supply-side policies which can indicate the long-term patterns of AS curve 
Quality of life does not seem to be that closely linked with it and we don’t get to taken into account things like war or political oppression.
The success of government policy can also be seen
Human development altogether is difficult to measure and is based on normative economics. Other measures such as access to internet might be more important.
As it is one value it allows statistical analysis and other modeling to be done and is altogether a practical measure.
Changes over time – ceteris paribus